8 Best Parenting Books on How to Manage Toddlers

As a new parent, you have probably read a baby book or two to guide you during this challenging phase of your life.

Having a toddler would challenge all the things you think you learned about parenting. You may find yourself lost for what to do next as they are so stubborn and willful. Sometimes, you may even feel helpless and out-of-control due to their strangest quirks and ever-changing moods.

Fortunately, you can read parenting books for toddlers too to help you. Check out this list of books on how to manage your terrible twos!

8 Must-Read Parenting Books to Help Manage Toddlers

1.     “Toddler Taming” by Christopher Green

In “Toddler Taming,” Australian paediatrician Christopher Green shares invaluable practical advice on bringing up young children.

This parenting book thoroughly explains the “unusual” bad behaviour shown by toddlers, so that parents would understand that it’s not something to be afraid of. It also tackles other challenges faced during the terrible two stage, including sleeping problems, temper tantrums, and toilet training.

2.     “The Whole-Brain Child” by Daniel J. Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson

Written by New York Times best-selling authors Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne, “The Whole-Brain Child” discusses how a child’s developing brain works in a completely accessible way.

The parenting book explains that the “upstairs brain,” which is in charge of making decisions and balancing emotions, isn’t fully developed until the mid-twenties. This gives parents a glimpse on why toddlers tend to be emotional instead of logical.

By understanding these things, you can effectively promote healthy emotional and cognitive growth in your child.

3.     “The Conscious Parent” by Shefali Tsabary

This parenting book was written by Shefali Tsabary, a psychologist and mum of a teenage girl.

Dr. Tsabary believes in the conscious approach to parenting. She encourages mums and dads to shift away from the “one-size-fits-all” approach and instead, turn towards a mutual parent-child relationship.

When you make an effort to know your toddler and what he or she wants, you are closer to understanding not only your child but also yourself. This ultimately helps you become a good parent.

4.     “Nurture Shock” by Po Bronson & Ashley Merriman

In “Nurture Shock,” psychologists Po Bronson and Ashley Merriman highlight the role of science in parenting.

Most of the time, parents think that the problem is caused by their child’s challenging behaviours. They don’t realize that the real culprit is their strategies for nurturing their toddler.

This parenting book is unlike any parenting manual. It explores themes and issues that surpass children’s (and adults’) lives.

5.     “Children Are People Too” by Louise Porter

Louise Porter, an Australian child psychologist with 30 years of experience, promotes a guidance approach in this parenting book.

Instead of using a typical reward-based behavioural stance, she believes in the importance of communication. She also warns parents about the negative effects of fear-based parenting. She suggests using a child-centric way instead to help your toddler understand what “responsibility” means.

6.     “Heart to Heart Parenting” by Robin Grille

Robin Grille’s parenting book “Heart to Heart Parenting” emphasises the same points in Louise Porter’s manual.

It introduces an empathetic and emotion-based approach to parenting, one that moves away from the usual firm control perspective that parents believe in.

The book mainly asks the question: “what can we do when we make the painful discovery that something we have done has caused our child to hurt?”

This is something that new parents should definitely read as it shows you the universal approach to being a parent.

7.     “French Children Don’t Throw Food” by Pamela Druckerman

Do you want to read something light and funny? Pick up Pamela Druckerman’s parenting book, “French Children Don’t Throw Food.”

It mainly revolves around “The Pause” method, a popular technique used by French parents. It teaches you to wait and observe your toddler for a few minutes before jumping in the situation. This allows your child to settle on their own without your help, ultimately helping them become independent.

8.     “There’s No Such Thing As Bad Weather” by Linda Akeson McGurk

Another must-read foreign parenting book is “There’s No Such Thing As Bad Weather” by Linda Akeson McGurk, a Swedish mum.

It emphasises the importance of spending time outdoors instead of staying inside during this important period in your child’s life. The book urges parents to let their toddlers play and discover the world outside.

This fascinating personal narrative would ultimately open your eyes to the benefits of outdoor play, even in this age of technology.

Most parents will agree that managing toddlers is one of the hardest tasks during parenting. Fortunately, you can understand what your child is going through with these parenting books. These would help you raise your little one in a way that is gentle, kind, and more empathic.

Author Bio:

LCS, a company in Australia who has used The Nurture Sleep Program. This program is designed to take babies from sleepless to slumber.

Company Bio:

Nurture Parenting is recognised as Australia’s baby sleep expert. Headed by Karen Faulkner, a Baby and Toddler Sleep Consultant, the company offers The Nurture Sleep Program that offers a holistic approach to baby sleep and helps babies and children on sleep training. This is a tried and tested approach that has already transformed the lives of families through its exclusive baby sleep methods that help baby self-settle and promote blissful sleep.

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